Hello fellow sports fans!

Did your football team play in a conference championship game this weekend?  I was lucky enough to travel to Indianapolis to watch Wisconsin and Penn State battle for the Big 10 Championship.   My husband and I, along with my dad and step mom, had lots of fun at Fan Fest and the Badger Tailgate Party before the game, and had great seats in Lucas Oil Stadium.  And even though the game didn’t end with a Badgers win, we still had a very enjoyable weekend.20161203_134542

 

Last week I shared the first in my series of easy scarf projects that can be made in your favorite team colors.  This week I’m back with a variation of that scarf that adds a little flair with fringed ends.  It’s still a quick and easy no sew project that takes just minutes to make.finished

So let’s get started:

Step 1 – The Supplies

Find all of these things at your local craft store, if you don’t have them at home:

  • ¼ yard of fleece fabric
    • choose your favorite team color (solid or print)
    • most fleece is 60” wide, so your scarf will be about 60” long
    • Or buy ½ yard and make 2 scarves
  • Sharp Scissors (preferably a fabric scissors, but any sharp scissors will work)
  • A ruler

1-supplies

 

Step 2 – Lay out and mark the fleece (if you bought more than ¼ yard, or want a narrower scarf)

  • Lay the fleece out on a flat surface
    • Smooth out any wrinkles
    • Make sure all of the edges are aligned neatly
  • Use the ruler to make marks 9” in from the edge
    • NOTE: You can adjust this if you’d like your scarf to be wider or narrower

2-mark

 

Step 3 – Cut the fleece (if you bought more than ¼ yard, or want a narrower scarf)

  • Use your scissors to cut along the marks you made
    • If you are using a really sharp scissors, you can keep the fleece folded in half, and cut through a double thickness
    • If your scissors isn’t very sharp, I suggest unfolding the fleece, and only cutting through one thickness at a time

 

Step 4 – Trim the selvage

  • The selvage is the rough edges opposite the fold (see pic)
  • You can leave these on your scarf, but I prefer to cut them off
  • You should be able to eye ball the cut, but use a ruler to mark a straight line if you feel more comfortable doing it that way.

 

Step 5 – Measure and mark fringe length

  • Use the ruler to make several marks that are 4” from the short ends
  • Use the ruler to draw a straight line along these marks
  • This line will be the stopping point for the fringe
    • NOTE: You can adjust this measurement if you’d like your fringe to be shorter or longer
  • Repeat for the other end of the scarf

5-mark-fringe-length

 

Step 6 – Measure and cut the fringe

  • Place the ruler along a short end of the scarf
  • Using the ruler as a guide, cut the first fringe ½” in from the long edge the scarf, stopping at the 4” line you drew
  • Move over ½” and cut the next fringe
    • OPTIONAL – you can make marks every ½” along both the bottom edge of the scarf and along the line you drew 4” from the end, if that makes it easy to cut straight
  • Continue cutting every ½” until you reach the other long edge

7-one-side-done

 

Step 7 – Repeat steps 5 and 6 on the other short edge of the scarf

8-repeat-other-side

 

Step 8– WEAR IT!

Your finished scarf is ready to wear!

Here are some care instructions:

  • Wash your fleece in cold water on the delicate or hand wash cycle.
  • Avoid bleach or fabric softener.
  • Tumble dry on LOW or simply air dry.
  • Ironing is NOT recommended.

 

What do you think of the fringe?  Just a little more work adds a lot of extra flair, doesn’t it?

I hope you enjoy whipping up some of these easy scarves as gifts this year!

If you aren’t already, please follow the blog!  I’ll be back with more fleece scarf options over the next several weeks, and with even more team spirit crafts in the months to come!

 

Until next week,

Carrie

 

P.S.  Check back next week for another DIY fleece scarf … this time with a fancy yarn fringe:

20161205_085341

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